Contemporary sculptural art embodied in the best works of MoMA
Classical styles in gypsum stucco and sculpture do not lose their relevance to this day. Refined elements of baroque and neoclassicism still adorn luxurious mansions and the most ordinary apartments.…

Continue reading →

Abstractionism
The tendency of the separation of art from the image of reality received a logical conclusion in the works of abstract artists. Their work was distinguished by a complete lack…

Continue reading →

Hermitage sculpture
Visitors to the State Hermitage have a unique opportunity to see the best plastic samples created by masters for the entire time that intelligent life on Earth has existed. Perhaps…

Continue reading →

Monet Claude Oscar

Claude Oscar Monet was born in Paris on November 14, 1840. When the future artist was five years old, his family moved to the port city of Le Havre on the coast of Normandy, where Monet spent his childhood and early youth. At school, Monet did very mediocre in all subjects, with the exception of one – drawing, where Claude showed the artist’s innate talent, and primarily as a cartoonist. At age 15, he was already selling his cartoons and even gained some fame locally. Around the same time, Monet met the artist Eugene Boudin, who persuaded Claude to work out on landscapes, and the young Monet discovered that this was his calling. Boudin loved to write in nature, because he believed that only in this way can you capture what the artist saw in all its purity and freshness. Monet was carried away by this idea, and subsequently it became one of the cornerstones, both for the work of the artist himself and for impressionism as a whole.

Monet spends 1859-1860 in Paris, where he studies art. His student life, like the first years of his career as an artist, was often overshadowed by financial difficulties, as Claude remained completely dependent on his father. However, in 1861-1862, significant changes took place in the artist’s life. He goes to military service in Algeria. As an artist, Monet was fascinated by the landscapes of North Africa, but soon became ill with anemia and was demobilized. In the autumn of 1862, Monet returned to Paris and became a pupil of Charles Gleyre, the then famous painter. Monet did not give much to the lessons in the workshop of Gleur, but here he met young artists, some of them became not only his friends, but also entered the group of impressionists.

In the workshop of Gleyre Monet remained until 1864. The following year, the Paris Salon selected two of his paintings for his annual exhibition, and this was perhaps the only opportunity for the artist to become known to the general public.

However, Monet did not manage to stay on the crest of initial success. In 1867, lack of money forced him to return to Le Havre. By this time he had a lover, Camille Donsier, whom he met in 1865, who gave birth to his son in Paris at the time when Monet himself was in his father’s house. Probably, this period in Monet’s life was the worst in his life. The artist started having vision problems, although, thank God, they turned out to be temporary.

In 1870, Monet married Camille. At the end of 1871, Monet returned to Paris and hired a house in Argenteuil, a small town on the banks of the Seine. Monet was completely captivated by the boats, bridges, river and nature around Argenteuil, and his paintings and drawings from that period can rightfully be called the sunniest in his life. Argenteuil remained for Monet home until 1878. Here he was often visited by friends, including Manet, Renoir and Sisley, and their works also bear the imprint of the happy, calm atmosphere of this place.

In 1874, the Impressionists staged a group exhibition of their works in Paris. However, at that time they called themselves the “Joint-Stock Company of Artists and Painters” – a little later, one of the observers clung to the name of one of Monet’s paintings – “Impression. Sunrise ”, as a result of which the name was born – impressionism. The artists themselves began to officially call themselves impressionists since 1877, when their work amounted to one third of the total number of paintings exhibited at a joint exhibition. Such exhibitions helped the Impressionists gradually strengthen their reputation as the audience began to get used to the bright colors and careless strokes on their canvases.

For a short time, Monet entrusted the conduct of his financial affairs to Ernest Goshed, a businessman who bought paintings by the artist. Unfortunately, in 1878, Goshede went bankrupt. The following year, the Monet and Gauchede families pooled their remaining money and moved to Vetheuil, a village on the banks of the Seine northwest of Paris.

Soon after the move, Monet’s second son, Michel, is born. In 1881, the Monet family left Vetej and moved to Giverny. It was here that Monet spent the rest of his life.

By this time, Monet’s career went uphill. By the age of 50, Monet had become a well-to-do man. This success allowed him to expand the garden in Giverny, which has now become his greatest love, and almost the only object that Monet depicted on his later canvases ..

Once, Monet admitted that the two biggest passions in his life are painting and gardening. When he painted flowers, both of these passions united. In “Field of Poppies”, as in many of his other canvases, Monet enjoys wild, vibrant colors. Some of Monet’s beautiful still lifes with cut flowers are known, but most of all he liked to paint flowers growing in his gardens, first in Argenteuil, and later in Giverny. In 1871, Monet and his family moved to Argenteuil to find there his first home and his first garden.

I'm a cat, mother of life
Nowhere is a cat revered like in Egypt. The complex metaphorical meaning that world mythology endowed with the image of this beautiful intelligent animal, the Egyptians reduced to positive, pleasant…

...

Plaster stucco on the marine theme
At all times, magnificent temples and palaces were erected dedicated to the sea and the noble profession of sailors. Such architectural monuments can be found in Russia, in the countries…

...

Renaissance sculpture
Sculpture, as one of the oldest forms of art, changes with people and time. And sculptures of the Renaissance are no exception. What do we know about the Renaissance or,…

...

Henry Moore - The Genius of Plaster Art
In sculpture, gypsum is often considered as a means to create the primary model, which is then used to make more durable work of stone or metal. Nevertheless, it is…

...