National Gallery, London, England
In England, as every more or less stubborn student knows, the oldest constitutional monarchy. Therefore, it is customary to think that there, especially in former times, nothing was done without…

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Surrealism
Surrealism (from the French surrealisme - literally super-realism) is a trend in contemporary bourgeois art that originated in France in the early 1920s. Being a characteristic expression of the crisis…

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Romanticism
Romanticism (French romantisme from Latin romanum Roman from Roma - Rome) is one of two, along with Classicism, the fundamental tendencies of artistic thinking. However, historically, they began to call…

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dynamic sense

Surrealism

Surrealism (from the French surrealisme – literally super-realism) is a trend in contemporary bourgeois art that originated in France in the early 1920s. Being a characteristic expression of the crisis of capitalist society. Surrealism finds its philosophical foundations in the subjective-idealistic theory of Freud. The contradictions tearing apart the bourgeois system, the feelings of horror in front of the real world, generated by these contradictions among some surrealist artists detached from the people, are embodied by the latter in images that cause an aversion to reality, to life. Hence the special interest of the surrealists in reproducing nightmares, hallucinations, pathological conditions. Created on the basis of the “principles” of surrealism, the paintings of Salvador Dali are filled with horrors, nightmares, and pessimism.

Its creators – young artists, poets considered surrealism as a way of knowing the subconscious, supernatural. According to the definition of the founder and ideologist of this trend, Andre Breton, surrealism is “pure psychic automatism, with the goal of expressing, either verbally, in writing, or in any other way, the real functioning of thought. The dictation of thought is beyond any control on the part of the mind, outside of any Continue reading

Baroque

Baroque – (Portuguese. Baroco – freaky, bad, wrong, spoiled). The term “baroque” has many meanings in the history of art. Among them are narrower, to indicate artistic styles in the art of various countries of the XVII-XVIII centuries, or broader – to identify ever-renewing trends of a restless, romantic attitude, thinking in expressive, dynamic forms, or generally as a poetic metaphor: “Baroque man” , “Baroque era”, “Baroque world”, “Baroque life”. Finally, in every time, almost in every historical art style, they find their “Baroque period”.

In the most famous sense, Baroque is a historical art style, which was spread initially in Italy in the middle of the XVI-XVII centuries, and then partially in France, as well as in Spain, Flanders and Germany of the XVII-XVIII centuries. The Baroque Style is remarkable in that for the first time in the history of world art, seemingly unconnectable components were combined in it: Classicism and Romanticism. Until the turn of the 16th-17th centuries, Classicism and Romanticism existed as two independent, in all opposing artistic directions, two trends of artistic thinking. Continue reading

Amazing stucco molding of the hunting castle Stupinigi
The Stupinigi Hunting Castle is one of the residences of the Royal House of Savoy in northern Italy, included in the UNESCO World Heritage List. Built as a royal hunting…

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Sculptures of the louvre museum
For a millennium, the Parisian residence of the French kings has long been the richest collection of masterpieces of world art. It is impossible to view the museum’s exposition in…

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6 women sculptors able to make a breakthrough in sculpture
Sculpture was once considered the area of ​​work of male artists, as physically complex as unlimited in scope. But over the past few decades, artists from Eva Hesse to Ursula…

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Henry Moore - The Genius of Plaster Art
In sculpture, gypsum is often considered as a means to create the primary model, which is then used to make more durable work of stone or metal. Nevertheless, it is…

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